Did you know that the Haitian Creole language has a Latin derived alphabet? Would you be surprised to hear that you should understand a limited percentage of a conversation among Haitians if you are fully proficient in French? Creole language, also spoken by Haitian Diaspora or immigrants, is found in Martinique, Guadeloupe despite their localized Creole.

Creole Services

Creole Translation ServicesThe Creole translation work we do may be for all or segments of a document. Clients can present a variety of materials such as written document, electronic, and multi-media material for translation, including but not limited to, internal forms, English letters, scientific publications, marketing materials like signs & posters, website pages in HTML, access to CMS like Joomla, WordPress, pamphlets, regulations, and booklets.

All Creole documents are rendered at the lowest comprehension level. We can tailor the language so that the translated materials are understandable by the broadest groups in a specific Haitian province such as Cap Haitien, Port de Paix or specific Haitian immigrants. We always attempt to provide culturally sensitive translations. During the process of converting documents from English to Kreyòl, we must have another Creole translator manually proofread, edit all translated documents to ensure accuracy, correct spelling, consistence/continuity, compliance with clients' requirements and preferred style. Most assignments are electronically returned in Microsoft Office 2010. Other formats can be InDesign, Publisher.

Haitian Creole Grammar

Grammatically speaking, Haitian Creole complies with a variety of rules: Creole personal pronouns, Creole nouns, Haitian Creole verbs, Creole articles. There are six personal pronouns in Creole during an English to Creole translation. Haitian pronouns stay the same regardless of gender. For example: Li manje can mean he eats, she eats. Haitian nouns can be singular or plural. The word "yo" after a noun indicates plural in Creole. For example: Elèv lekòl yo vini ak papa yo. We do not add an S like we do mostly in French. Creole verbs are not conjugated in the Haitian language; they use the infinitive form. For example: mwen travay, li travay, m ap travay, yo t ap travay…The verb "travay" stays the same for past, present, future and progressive. The meaning is respectively: I work, s/he works, I am working, they were working. To express negative form, Haitian Creole uses the word "pa" before the verb. Mwen pa kapab ale nan sinema pita.

 

In English, "a" and "an" are considered definite and indefinite articles. The word "la" after a noun indicates a definite article in Haitian Creole; "yon" is an indefinite article placed before a noun. The Creole sentence "Mwen gen liv la" perfectly illustrates a Creole definite article whereas "Mwen gen yon liv" means that I have a book.

Creole Translation Sample

The multilingual team who teams with us specializes in Haitian Creole language. We accept any document irrespective of its format, source language while rendering Creole translations with visually pleasing presentation. We also have experienced graphic designers who can work with all Adobe collections, Quark, Microsoft Office, among others. The following sentences are written in Haitian.

Mwen ta renmen danse ak pitit fi Jan an
Gade kijan nèg sa ban mwen movejan!
Lè vakans rive, m' pral fè espò chak jou
Yo te di mwen ke manzè marye depi 10 zan
Gade machè, tanpri fè respè w'
Fanm sa makawon, mwen pa konseye w'
Ki kote mwen te ka achete yon ti kabrit nwè
Manzè sila pran pwen pou li volè inosan
Depi kilè w'ap tann mwen?
Vwazen sa se frè madan mwen
Bondye, gade jan yon nèg sanwont!
Na pale yon lòt lè vye frè mwen